React v0.5

This release is the result of several months of hard work from members of the team and the community. While there are no groundbreaking changes in core, we’ve worked hard to improve performance and memory usage. We’ve also worked hard to make sure we are being consistent in our usage of DOM properties.

The biggest change you’ll notice as a developer is that we no longer support class in JSX as a way to provide CSS classes. Since this prop was being converted to className at the transform step, it caused some confusion when trying to access it in composite components. As a result we decided to make our DOM properties mirror their counterparts in the JS DOM API. There are a few exceptions where we deviate slightly in an attempt to be consistent internally.

The other major change in v0.5 is that we’ve added an additional build - react-with-addons - which adds support for some extras that we’ve been working on including animations and two-way binding. Read more about these addons in the docs.

Thanks to Our Community

We added 22 new people to the list of authors since we launched React v0.4.1 nearly 3 months ago. With a total of 48 names in our AUTHORS file, that means we’ve nearly doubled the number of contributors in that time period. We’ve seen the number of people contributing to discussion on IRC, mailing lists, Stack Overflow, and GitHub continue rising. We’ve also had people tell us about talks they’ve given in their local community about React.

It’s been awesome to see the things that people are building with React, and we can’t wait to see what you come up with next!

Changelog

React

  • Memory usage improvements - reduced allocations in core which will help with GC pauses
  • Performance improvements - in addition to speeding things up, we made some tweaks to stay out of slow path code in V8 and Nitro.
  • Standardized prop -> DOM attribute process. This previously resulting in additional type checking and overhead as well as confusing cases for users. Now we will always convert your value to a string before inserting it into the DOM.
  • Support for Selection events.
  • Support for Composition events.
  • Support for additional DOM properties (charSet, content, form, httpEquiv, rowSpan, autoCapitalize).
  • Support for additional SVG properties (rx, ry).
  • Support for using getInitialState and getDefaultProps in mixins.
  • Support mounting into iframes.
  • Bug fixes for controlled form components.
  • Bug fixes for SVG element creation.
  • Added React.version.
  • Added React.isValidClass - Used to determine if a value is a valid component constructor.
  • Removed React.autoBind - This was deprecated in v0.4 and now properly removed.
  • Renamed React.unmountAndReleaseReactRootNode to React.unmountComponentAtNode.
  • Began laying down work for refined performance analysis.
  • Better support for server-side rendering - react-page has helped improve the stability for server-side rendering.
  • Made it possible to use React in environments enforcing a strict Content Security Policy. This also makes it possible to use React to build Chrome extensions.

React with Addons (New!)

  • Introduced a separate build with several “addons” which we think can help improve the React experience. We plan to deprecate this in the long-term, instead shipping each as standalone pieces. Read more in the docs.

JSX

  • No longer transform class to className as part of the transform! This is a breaking change - if you were using class, you must change this to className or your components will be visually broken.
  • Added warnings to the in-browser transformer to make it clear it is not intended for production use.
  • Improved compatibility for Windows
  • Improved support for maintaining line numbers when transforming.

Community Round-up #9

We organized a React hackathon last week-end in the Facebook Seattle office. 50 people, grouped into 15 teams, came to hack for a day on React. It was a lot of fun and we’ll probably organize more in the future.

React Hackathon Winner

Alex Swan implemented Qu.izti.me, a multi-player quiz game. It is real-time via Web Socket and mobile friendly.

The game itself is pretty simple. People join the “room” by going to http://qu.izti.me on their device. Large displays will show a leaderboard along with the game, and small displays (such as phones) will act as personal gamepads. Users will see questions and a choice of answers. The faster you answer, the more points you earn.

In my opinion, Socket.io and React go together like chocolate and peanut butter. The page was always an accurate representation of the game object.

Read More…

JSConf EU Talk: Rethinking Best Practices

Pete Hunt presented React at JSConf EU. He covers three controversial design decisions of React:

  1. Build components, not templates
  2. Re-render the whole app on every update
  3. Virtual DOM

The video will be available soon on the JSConf EU website, but in the meantime, here are Pete’s slides:

Pump - Clojure bindings for React

Alexander Solovyov has been working on React bindings for ClojureScript. This is really exciting as it is using “native” ClojureScript data structures.

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(ns your.app
(:require-macros [pump.def-macros :refer [defr]])
(:require [pump.core]))

(defr Component
:get-initial-state #(identity {:some-value ""})

[component props state]

[:div {:class-name "test"} "hello"])

Check it out on GitHub…

JSXHint

Todd Kennedy working at Condé Nast implemented a wrapper on-top of JSHint that first converts JSX files to JS.

A wrapper around JSHint to allow linting of files containing JSX syntax. Accepts glob patterns. Respects your local .jshintrc file and .gitignore to filter your glob patterns.

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> npm install -g jsxhint
>

Check it out on GitHub…

Turbo React

Ross Allen working at Mesosphere combined Turbolinks, a library used by Ruby on Rails to speed up page transition, and React.

“Re-request this page” is just a link to the current page. When you click it, Turbolinks intercepts the GET request and fetchs the full page via XHR.

The panel is rendered with a random panel- class on each request, and the progress bar gets a random widthX class.

With Turbolinks alone, the entire would be replaced, and transitions would not happen. In this little demo though, React adds and removes classes and text, and the attribute changes are animated with CSS transitions. The DOM is otherwise left intact.

Check out the demo…

Reactive Table

Stoyan Stefanov continues his series of blog posts about React. This one is an introduction tutorial on rendering a simple table with React.

React is all about components. So let’s build one.

Let’s call it Table (to avoid any confusion what the component is about).

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> var Table = React.createClass({
> /*stuff goeth here*/
> });
>

You see that React components are defined using a regular JS object. Some properties and methods of the object such as render() have special meanings, the rest is upforgrabs.

Read the full article…

One Year of Open-Source React

Today marks the one-year open-source anniversary of React.

It’s been a crazy ride. 2.3k commits and 1.5k issues and pull requests later, we’re approaching version 1.0 and nearing 7k GitHub stars, with big names such as Khan Academy, New York Times, and Airbnb (and naturally, Facebook and Instagram) using React in production, and many more developers blogging their success stories with it. The roadmap gives a glimpse into the future of the library; exciting stuff lies ahead!

Every success has its story. React was born out of our frustration at existing solutions for building UIs. When it was first suggested at Facebook, few people thought that functionally re-rendering everything and diffing the results could ever perform well. However, support grew after we built the first implementation and people wrote their first components. When we open-sourced React, the initial reception was similarly skeptical. It challenges many pre-established conventions and received mostly disapproving first-impressions, intermingled with positive ones that often were votes of confidence in Facebook’s engineering capabilities. On an open, competitive platform such as the web, it’s been hard to convince people to try React. JSX, in particular, filtered out a huge chunk of potential early adopters.

Fast forward one year, React has strongly grown in popularity. Special acknowledgments go to Khan Academy, the ClojureScript community, and established frameworks such as Ember and Angular for contributing to and debating on our work. We’d also like to thank all the individual contributors who have taken the time to help out over the past year. React, as a library and as a new paradigm on the web, wouldn’t have gained as much traction without them. In the future, we will continue to try to set an example of what’s possible to achieve when we rethink about current “best practices”.

Here’s to another year!

Flux: An Application Architecture for React

We recently spoke at one of f8’s breakout session about Flux, a data flow architecture that works well with React. Check out the video here:

To summarize, Flux works well for us because the single directional data flow makes it easy to understand and modify an application as it becomes more complicated. We found that two-way data bindings lead to cascading updates, where changing one data model led to another data model updating, making it very difficult to predict what would change as the result of a single user interaction.

In Flux, the Dispatcher is a singleton that directs the flow of data and ensures that updates do not cascade. As an application grows, the Dispatcher becomes more vital, as it can also manage dependencies between stores by invoking the registered callbacks in a specific order.

When a user interacts with a React view, the view sends an action (usually represented as a JavaScript object with some fields) through the dispatcher, which notifies the various stores that hold the application’s data and business logic. When the stores change state, they notify the views that something has updated. This works especially well with React’s declarative model, which allows the stores to send updates without specifying how to transition views between states.

Flux is more of a pattern than a formal framework, so you can start using Flux immediately without a lot of new code. An example of this architecture is available, along with more detailed documentation and a tutorial. Look for more examples to come in the future.

Use React and JSX in ASP.NET MVC

Today we’re happy to announce the initial release of
ReactJS.NET, which makes it easier to use React and JSX
in .NET applications, focusing specifically on ASP.NET MVC web applications.
It has several purposes:

  • On-the-fly JSX to JavaScript compilation. Simply reference JSX files and they
    will be compiled and cached server-side.

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    <script src="@Url.Content("/Scripts/HelloWorld.jsx")"></script>
  • JSX to JavaScript compilation via popular minification/combination libraries
    (Cassette and ASP.NET Bundling and Minification). This is suggested for
    production websites.

  • Server-side component rendering to make your initial render super fast.

Even though we are focusing on ASP.NET MVC, ReactJS.NET can also be used in
Web Forms applications as well as non-web applications (for example, in build
scripts). ReactJS.NET currently only works on Microsoft .NET but we are working
on support for Linux and Mac OS X via Mono as well.

Installation

ReactJS.NET is packaged in NuGet. Simply run Install-Package React.Mvc4 in the
package manager console or search NuGet for “React” to install it.
See the documentation for more information. The
GitHub project contains
a sample website
demonstrating all of the features.

Let us know what you think, and feel free to send through any feedback and
report bugs on GitHub.

The Road to 1.0

When we launched React last spring, we purposefully decided not to call it 1.0. It was production ready, but we had plans to evolve APIs and behavior as we saw how people were using React, both internally and externally. We’ve learned a lot over the past 9 months and we’ve thought a lot about what 1.0 will mean for React. A couple weeks ago, I outlined several projects that we have planned to take us to 1.0 and beyond. Today I’m writing a bit more about them to give our users a better insight into our plans.

Our primary goal with 1.0 is to clarify our messaging and converge on an API that is aligned with our goals. In order to do that, we want to clean up bad patterns we’ve seen in use and really help enable developers write good code.

Descriptors

The first part of this is what we’re calling “descriptors”. I talked about this briefly in our v0.10 announcements. The goal here is to separate our virtual DOM representation from our use of it. Simply, this means the return value of a component (e.g. React.DOM.div(), MyComponent()) will be a simple object containing the information React needs to render. Currently the object returned is actually linked to React’s internal representation of the component and even directly to the DOM element. This has enabled some bad patterns that are quite contrary to how we want people to use React. That’s our failure.

We added some warnings in v0.9 to start migrating some of these bad patterns. With v0.10 we’ll catch more. You’ll see more on this soon as we expect to ship v0.11 with descriptors.

API Cleanup

This is really connected to everything. We want to keep the API as simple as possible and help developers fall into the pit of success. Enabling bad patterns with bad APIs is not success.

ES6

Before we even launched React publicly, members of the team were talking about how we could leverage ES6, namely classes, to improve the experience of creating React components. Calling React.createClass(...) isn’t great. We don’t quite have the right answer here yet, but we’re close. We want to make sure we make this as simple as possible. It could look like this:

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class MyComponent extends React.Component {
render() {
...
}
}

There are other features of ES6 we’re already using in core. I’m sure we’ll see more of that. The jsx executable we ship with react-tools already supports transforming many parts of ES6 into code that will run on older browsers.

Context

While we haven’t documented context, it exists in some form in React already. It exists as a way to pass values through a tree without having to use props at every single point. We’ve seen this need crop up time and time again, so we want to make this as easy as possible. Its use has performance tradeoffs, and there are known weaknesses in our implementation, so we want to make sure this is a solid feature.

Addons

As you may know, we ship a separate build of React with some extra features we called “addons”. While this has served us fine, it’s not great for our users. It’s made testing harder, but also results in more cache misses for people using a CDN. The problem we face is that many of these “addons” need access to parts of React that we don’t expose publicly. Our goal is to ship each addon on its own and let each hook into React as needed. This would also allow others to write and distribute “addons”.

Browser Support

As much as we’d all like to stop supporting older browsers, it’s not always possible. Facebook still supports IE8. While React won’t support IE8 forever, our goal is to have 1.0 support IE8. Hopefully we can continue to abstract some of these rough parts.

Animations

Finding a way to define animations in a declarative way is a hard problem. We’ve been exploring the space for a long time. We’ve introduced some half-measures to alleviate some use cases, but the larger problem remains. While we’d like to make this a part of 1.0, realistically we don’t think we’ll have a good solution in place.

Miscellaneous

There are several other things I listed on our projects page that we’re tracking. Some of them are internals and have no obvious outward effect (improve tests, repo separation, updated test runner). I encourage you to take a look.

React v0.10

Hot on the heels of the release candidate earlier this week, we’re ready to call v0.10 done. The only major issue we discovered had to do with the react-tools package, which has been updated. We’ve copied over the changelog from the RC with some small clarifying changes.

The release is available for download from the CDN:

We’ve also published version 0.10.0 of the react and react-tools packages on npm and the react package on bower.

Please try these builds out and file an issue on GitHub if you see anything awry.

Clone On Mount

The main purpose of this release is to provide a smooth upgrade path as we evolve some of the implementation of core. In v0.9 we started warning in cases where you called methods on unmounted components. This is part of an effort to enforce the idea that the return value of a component (React.DOM.div(), MyComponent()) is in fact not a reference to the component instance React uses in the virtual DOM. The return value is instead a light-weight object that React knows how to use. Since the return value currently is a reference to the same object React uses internally, we need to make this transition in stages as many people have come to depend on this implementation detail.

In 0.10, we’re adding more warnings to catch a similar set of patterns. When a component is mounted we clone it and use that object for our internal representation. This allows us to capture calls you think you’re making to a mounted component. We’ll forward them on to the right object, but also warn you that this is breaking. See “Access to the Mounted Instance” on this page. Most of the time you can solve your pattern by using refs.

Storing a reference to your top level component is a pattern touched upon on that page, but another examples that demonstrates what we see a lot of:

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// This is a common pattern. However instance here really refers to a
// "descriptor", not necessarily the mounted instance.
var instance = <MyComponent/>;
React.renderComponent(instance);
// ...
instance.setProps(...);

// The change here is very simple. The return value of renderComponent will be
// the mounted instance.
var instance = React.renderComponent(<MyComponent/>)
// ...
instance.setProps(...);

These warnings and method forwarding are only enabled in the development build. The production builds continue to work as they did in v0.9. We strongly encourage you to use the development builds to catch these warnings and fix the call sites.

The plan for v0.11 is that we will go fully to “descriptors”. Method calls on the return value of MyComponent() will fail hard.

Changelog

React Core

New Features

  • Added warnings to help migrate towards descriptors
  • Made it possible to server render without React-related markup (data-reactid, data-react-checksum). This DOM will not be mountable by React. Read the docs for React.renderComponentToStaticMarkup
  • Added support for more attributes:
    • srcSet for <img> to specify images at different pixel ratios
    • textAnchor for SVG

Bug Fixes

  • Ensure all void elements don’t insert a closing tag into the markup.
  • Ensure className={false} behaves consistently
  • Ensure this.refs is defined, even if no refs are specified.

Addons

react-tools

  • Added an option argument to transform function. The only option supported is harmony, which behaves the same as jsx --harmony on the command line. This uses the ES6 transforms from jstransform.

React v0.10 RC

v0.9 has only been out for a month, but we’re getting ready to push out v0.10 already. Unlike v0.9 which took a long time, we don’t have a long list of changes to talk about.

The release candidate is available for download from the CDN:

We’ve also published version 0.10.0-rc1 of the react and react-tools packages on npm and the react package on bower.

Please try these builds out and file an issue on GitHub if you see anything awry.

Clone On Mount

The main purpose of this release is to provide a smooth upgrade path as we evolve some of the implementation of core. In v0.9 we started warning in cases where you called methods on unmounted components. This is part of an effort to enforce the idea that the return value of a component (React.DOM.div(), MyComponent()) is in fact not a reference to the component instance React uses in the virtual DOM. The return value is instead a light-weight object that React knows how to use. Since the return value currently is a reference to the same object React uses internally, we need to make this transition in stages as many people have come to depend on this implementation detail.

In 0.10, we’re adding more warnings to catch a similar set of patterns. When a component is mounted we clone it and use that object for our internal representation. This allows us to capture calls you think you’re making to a mounted component. We’ll forward them on to the right object, but also warn you that this is breaking. See “Access to the Mounted Instance” on this page. Most of the time you can solve your pattern by using refs.

Storing a reference to your top level component is a pattern touched upon on that page, but another examples that demonstrates what we see a lot of:

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// This is a common pattern. However instance here really refers to a
// "descriptor", not necessarily the mounted instance.
var instance = <MyComponent/>;
React.renderComponent(instance);
// ...
instance.setProps(...);

// The change here is very simple. The return value of renderComponent will be
// the mounted instance.
var instance = React.renderComponent(<MyComponent/>)
// ...
instance.setProps(...);

These warnings and method forwarding are only enabled in the development build. The production builds continue to work as they did in v0.9. We strongly encourage you to use the development builds to catch these warnings and fix the call sites.

The plan for v0.11 is that we will go fully to “descriptors”. Method calls on the return value of MyComponent() will fail hard.

Changelog

React Core

New Features

  • Added warnings to help migrate towards descriptors
  • Made it possible to server render without React-related markup (data-reactid, data-react-checksum). This DOM will not be mountable by React. Read the docs for React.renderComponentToStaticMarkup
  • Added support for more attributes:
    • srcSet for <img> to specify images at different pixel ratios
    • textAnchor for SVG

Bug Fixes

  • Ensure all void elements don’t insert a closing tag into the markup.
  • Ensure className={false} behaves consistently
  • Ensure this.refs is defined, even if no refs are specified.

Addons

react-tools

  • Added an option argument to transform function. The only option supported is harmony, which behaves the same as jsx --harmony on the command line. This uses the ES6 transforms from jstransform.

Community Round-up #18

In this Round-up, we are taking a few closer looks at React’s interplay with different frameworks and architectures.

“Little framework BIG splash”

Let’s start with yet another refreshing introduction to React: Craig Savolainen (@maedhr) walks through some first steps, demonstrating how to build a Google Maps component using React.

Architecting your app with react

Brandon Konkle (@bkonkle)
Architecting your app with react
We’re looking forward to part 2!

React is not a full MVC framework, and this is actually one of its strengths. Many who adopt React choose to do so alongside their favorite MVC framework, like Backbone. React has no opinions about routing or syncing data, so you can easily use your favorite tools to handle those aspects of your frontend application. You’ll often see React used to manage specific parts of an application’s UI and not others. React really shines, however, when you fully embrace its strategies and make it the core of your application’s interface.

Read the full article…

React vs. async DOM manipulation

Eliseu Monar (@eliseumds)’s post “ReactJS vs async concurrent rendering“ is a great example of how React quite literally renders a whole array of common web development work(arounds) obsolete.

React, Scala and the Play Framework

Matthias Nehlsen wrote a detailed introductory piece on React and the Play Framework, including a helpful architectural diagram of a typical React app.

Nehlsen’s React frontend is the second implementation of his chat application’s frontend, following an AngularJS version. Both implementations are functionally equivalent and offer some perspective on differences between the two frameworks.

In another article, he walks us through the process of using React with scala.js to implement app-wide undo functionality.

Also check out his talk at Ping Conference 2014, in which he walks through a lot of the previously content in great detail.

React and Backbone

The folks over at Venmo are using React in conjunction with Backbone.
Thomas Boyt (@thomasaboyt) wrote this detailed piece about why React and Backbone are “a fantastic pairing”.

React vs. Ember

Eric Berry (@coderberry) developed Ember equivalents for some of the official React examples. Read his post for a side-by-side comparison of the respective implementations: “Facebook React vs. Ember”.

React and plain old HTML

Daniel Lo Nigro (@Daniel15) created React-Magic, which leverages React to ajaxify plain old html pages and even allows CSS transitions between pageloads.

React-Magic intercepts all navigation (link clicks and form posts) and loads the requested page via an AJAX request. React is then used to “diff” the old HTML with the new HTML, and only update the parts of the DOM that have been changed.

Check out the project on GitHub…

On a related note, Reactize by Ross Allen (@ssorallen) is a similarly awesome project: A wrapper for Rails’ Turbolinks, which seems to have inspired John Lynch (@johnrlynch) to then create a server-rendered version using the JSX transformer in Rails middleware.

React and Object.observe

Check out François de Campredon‘s implementation of TodoMVC based on React and ES6’s Object.observe.

React and Angular

Ian Bicking (@ianbicking) of Mozilla Labs explains why he “decided to go with React instead of Angular.js”.

ng-React Update

David Chang works through some performance improvements of his ngReact project. His post “ng-React Update - React 0.9 and Angular Track By” includes some helpful advice on boosting render performance for Angular components.

Angular gives you a ton of functionality out of the box - a full MV* framework - and I am a big fan, but I’ll admit that you need to know how to twist the right knobs to get performance.

That said, React gives you a very strong view component out of the box with the performance baked right in. Try as I did, I couldn’t actually get it any faster. So pretty impressive stuff.

Read the full post…

React was also recently mentioned at ng-conf, where the Angular team commented on React’s concept of the virtual DOM:

React and Web Components

Jonathan Krause (@jonykrause) offers his thoughts regarding parallels between React and Web Components, highlighting the value of React’s ability to render pages on the server practically for free.

Immutable React

Peter Hausel shows how to build a Wikipedia auto-complete demo based on immutable data structures (similar to mori), really taking advantage of the framework’s one-way reactive data binding:

Its truly reactive design makes DOM updates finally sane and when combined with persistent data structures one can experience JavaScript development like it was never done before.

Read the full post

D3 and React

Ben Smith built some great SVG-based charting components using a little less of D3 and a little more of React: D3 and React - the future of charting components?

Om and React

Josh Haberman (@joshhaberman) discusses performance differences between React, Om and traditional MVC frameworks in “A closer look at OM vs React performance“.

Speaking of Om: Omchaya by Sean Grove (@sgrove) is a neat Cljs/Om example project.

Random Tweets

Community Round-up #17

It’s exciting to see the number of real-world React applications and components skyrocket over the past months! This community round-up features a few examples of inspiring React applications and components.

React in the Real World

Facebook Lookback video editor

Large parts of Facebook’s web frontend are already powered by React. The recently released Facebook Lookback video and its corresponding editor are great examples of a complex, real-world React app.

Russia’s largest bank is now powered by React

Sberbank, Russia’s largest bank, recently switched large parts of their site to use React, as detailed in this post by Vyacheslav Slinko.

Relato

Relato by Ben Ripkens shows Open Source Statistics based on npm data. It features a filterable and sortable table built in React. Check it out – it’s super fast!

Makona Editor

John Lynch (@johnrlynch) created Makona, a block-style document editor for the web. Blocks of different content types comprise documents, authored using plain markup. At the switch of a toggle, block contents are then rendered on the page. While not quite a WYSIWYG editor, Makona uses plain textareas for input. This makes it compatible with a wider range of platforms than traditional rich text editors.

Create Chrome extensions using React

React is in no way limited to just web pages. Brandon Tilley (@BinaryMuse) just released a detailed walk-through of how he built his Chrome extension “Fast Tab Switcher” using React.

Twitter Streaming Client

Javier Aguirre (@javaguirre) put together a simple twitter streaming client using node, socket.io and React.

Sproutsheet

Sproutsheet is a gardening calendar. You can use it to track certain events that happen in the life of your plants. It’s currently in beta and supports localStorage, and data/image import and export.

Instant Domain Search also uses React. It sure is instant!

SVG-based graphical node editor

NoFlo and Meemoo developer Forresto Oliphant built an awesome SVG-based node editor in React.

Ultimate Tic-Tac-Toe Game in React

Rafał Cieślak (@Ravicious) wrote a React version of Ultimate Tic Tac Toe. Find the source here.

Emanuele Rampichini‘s ReactJS Gallery is a cool demo app that shows fullscreen images from a folder on the server. If the folder content changes, the gallery app updates via websockets.

Emanuele shared this awesome demo video with us:

React Components

Table Sorter

Table Sorter by bgerm [source] is another helpful React component.

Dmitry Chestnykh @dchest wrote a static search indexer in Go, along with a React-based web front-end that consumes search result via JSON.

Lorem Ipsum component

Martin Andert created react-lorem-component, a simple component for all your placeholding needs.

Input with placeholder shim

react-input-placeholder by enigma-io is a small wrapper around React.DOM.input that shims in placeholder functionality for browsers that don’t natively support it.

diContainer

dicontainer provides a dependency container that lets you inject Angular-style providers and services as simple React.js Mixins.

React server rendering

Ever wonder how to pre-render React components on the server? react-server-example by Michael Hart (@hichaelmart) walks through the necessary steps.

Similarly, Alan deLevie (@adelevie) created react-client-server-starter, another detailed walk-through of how to server-render your app.

Random Tweet

,