Community Round-up #15

Interest in React seems to have surged ever since David Nolen (@swannodette)’s introduction of Om in his post “The Future of JavaScript MVC Frameworks”.

In this React Community Round-up, we are taking a closer look at React from a functional programming perspective.

“React: Another Level of Indirection”

To start things off, Eric Normand (@ericnormand) of LispCast makes the case for React from a general functional programming standpoint and explains how React’s “Virtual DOM provides the last piece of the Web Frontend Puzzle for ClojureScript”.

The Virtual DOM is an indirection mechanism that solves the difficult problem of DOM programming: how to deal with incremental changes to a stateful tree structure. By abstracting away the statefulness, the Virtual DOM turns the real DOM into an immediate mode GUI, which is perfect for functional programming.

Read the full post…

Reagent: Minimalistic React for ClojureScript

Dan Holmsand (@holmsand) created Reagent, a simplistic ClojureScript API to React.

It allows you to define efficient React components using nothing but plain ClojureScript functions and data, that describe your UI using a Hiccup-like syntax.

The goal of Reagent is to make it possible to define arbitrarily complex UIs using just a couple of basic concepts, and to be fast enough by default that you rarely have to care about performance.

Check it out on GitHub…

Functional DOM programming

React’s one-way data-binding naturally lends itself to a functional programming approach. Facebook’s Pete Hunt (@floydophone) explores how one would go about writing web apps in a functional manner. Spoiler alert:

This is React. It’s not about templates, or data binding, or DOM manipulation. It’s about using functional programming with a virtual DOM representation to build ambitious, high-performance apps with JavaScript.

Read the full post…

Pete also explains this in detail at his #MeteorDevShop talk (about 30 Minutes):

Kioo: Separating markup and logic

Creighton Kirkendall created Kioo, which adds Enlive-style templating to React. HTML templates are separated from the application logic. Kioo comes with separate examples for both Om and Reagent.

A basic example from github:

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<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<body>
<header>
<h1>Header placeholder</h1>
<ul id="navigation">
<li class="nav-item"><a href="#">Placeholder</a></li>
</ul>
</header>
<div class="content">place holder</div>
</body>
</html>
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...

(defn my-nav-item [[caption func]]
(kioo/component "main.html" [:.nav-item]
{[:a] (do-> (content caption)
(set-attr :onClick func))}))

(defn my-header [heading nav-elms]
(kioo/component "main.html" [:header]
{[:h1] (content heading)
[:ul] (content (map my-nav-item nav-elms))}))

(defn my-page [data]
(kioo/component "main.html"
{[:header] (substitute (my-header (:heading data)
(:navigation data)))
[:.content] (content (:content data))}))

(def app-state (atom {:heading "main"
:content "Hello World"
:navigation [["home" #(js/alert %)]
["next" #(js/alert %)]]}))

(om/root app-state my-page (.-body js/document))

Om

In an interview with David Nolen, Tom Coupland (@tcoupland) of InfoQ provides a nice summary of recent developments around Om (“Om: Enhancing Facebook’s React with Immutability“).

David [Nolen]: I think people are starting to see the limitations of just JavaScript and jQuery and even more structured solutions like Backbone, Angular, Ember, etc. React is a fresh approach to the DOM problem that seems obvious in hindsight.

Read the full interview…

A slice of React, ClojureScript and Om

Fredrik Dyrkell (@lexicallyscoped) rewrote part of the React tutorial in both ClojureScript and Om, along with short, helpful explanations.

React has sparked a lot of interest in the Clojure community lately […]. At the very core, React lets you build up your DOM representation in a functional fashion by composing pure functions and you have a simple building block for everything: React components.

Read the full post…

In a separate post, Dyrkell breaks down how to build a binary clock component in Om.

[Demo] [Code]

Time Travel: Implementing undo in Om

David Nolen shows how to leverage immutable data structures to add global undo functionality to an app – using just 13 lines of ClojureScript.

A Step-by-Step Om Walkthrough

Josh Lehman took the time to create an extensive step-by-step walkthrough of the React tutorial in Om. The well-documented source is on github.

Omkara

brendanyounger created omkara, a starting point for ClojureScript web apps based on Om/React. It aims to take advantage of server-side rendering and comes with a few tips on getting started with Om/React projects.

Om Experience Report

Adam Solove (@asolove) dives a little deeper into Om, React and ClojureScript. He shares some helpful tips he gathered while building his CartoCrayon prototype.

Not-so-random Tweet

Community Round-up #14

The theme of this first round-up of 2014 is integration. I’ve tried to assemble a list of articles and projects that use React in various environments.

React Baseline

React is only one-piece of your web application stack. Mark Lussier shared his baseline stack that uses React along with Grunt, Browserify, Bower, Zepto, Director and Sass. This should help you get started using React for a new project.

As I do more projects with ReactJS I started to extract a baseline to use when starting new projects. This is very opinionated and I change my opinion from time to time. This is by no ways perfect and in your opinion most likely wrong :).. which is why I love github

I encourage you to fork, and make it right and submit a pull request!

My current opinion is using tools like Grunt, Browserify, Bower and multiple grunt plugins to get the job done. I also opted for Zepto over jQuery and the Flatiron Project’s Director when I need a router. Oh and for the last little bit of tech that makes you mad, I am in the SASS camp when it comes to stylesheets

Check it out on GitHub…

Animal Sounds

Josh Duck used React in order to build a Windows 8 tablet app. This is a good example of a touch app written in React.

Download the app…

React Rails Tutorial

Selem Delul bundled the React Tutorial into a rails app. This is a good example on how to get started with a rails project.

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> git clone https://github.com/necrodome/react-rails-tutorial
> cd react-rails-tutorial
> bundle install
> rake db:migrate
> rails s
>

Then visit http://localhost:3000/app to see the React application that is explained in the React Tutorial. Try opening multiple tabs!

View on GitHub…

Mixing with Backbone

Eldar Djafarov implemented a mixin to link Backbone models to React state and a small abstraction to write two-way binding on-top.

View code on JSFiddle

Check out the blog post…

React Infinite Scroll

Guillaume Rivals implemented an InfiniteScroll component. This is a good example of a React component that has a simple yet powerful API.

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<InfiniteScroll
pageStart={0}
loadMore={loadFunc}
hasMore={true || false}
loader={<div className="loader">Loading ...</div>}>
{items} // <-- This is the "stuff" you want to load
</InfiniteScroll>

Try it out on GitHub!

Web Components Style

Thomas Aylott implemented an API that looks like Web Components but using React underneath.

View the source on JSFiddle…

React vs Angular

React is often compared with Angular. Pete Hunt wrote an opinionated post on the subject.

First of all I think it’s important to evaluate technologies on objective rather than subjective features. “It feels nicer” or “it’s cleaner” aren’t valid reasons: performance, modularity, community size and ease of testing / integration with other tools are.

I’ve done a lot of work benchmarking, building apps, and reading the code of Angular to try to come up with a reasonable comparison between their ways of doing things.

Read the full post…

Random Tweet

React Chrome Developer Tools

With the new year, we thought you’d enjoy some new tools for debugging React code. Today we’re releasing the React Developer Tools, an extension to the Chrome Developer Tools. Download them from the Chrome Web Store.

You will get a new tab titled “React” in your Chrome DevTools. This tab shows you a list of the root React Components that are rendered on the page as well as the subcomponents that each root renders.

Selecting a Component in this tab allows you to view and edit its props and state in the panel on the right. In the breadcrumbs at the bottom, you can inspect the selected Component, the Component that created it, the Component that created that one, and so on.

When you inspect a DOM element using the regular Elements tab, you can switch over to the React tab and the corresponding Component will be automatically selected. The Component will also be automatically selected if you have a breakpoint within its render phase. This allows you to step through the render tree and see how one Component affects another one.

We hope these tools will help your team better understand your component hierarchy and track down bugs. We’re very excited about this initial launch and appreciate any feedback you may have. As always, we also accept pull requests on GitHub.

Community Round-up #13

Happy holidays! This blog post is a little-late Christmas present for all the React users. Hopefully it will inspire you to write awesome web apps in 2014!

React Touch

Pete Hunt wrote three demos showing that React can be used to run 60fps native-like experiences on mobile web. A frosted glass effect, an image gallery with 3d animations and an infinite scroll view.

Try out the demos!

Introduction to React

Stoyan Stefanov talked at Joe Dev On Tech about React. He goes over all the features of the library and ends with a concrete example.

JSX: E4X The Good Parts

JSX is often compared to the now defunct E4X, Vjeux went over all the E4X features and explained how JSX is different and hopefully doesn’t repeat the same mistakes.

E4X (ECMAScript for XML) is a JavaScript syntax extension and a runtime to manipulate XML. It was promoted by Mozilla but failed to become mainstream and is now deprecated. JSX was inspired by E4X. In this article, I’m going to go over all the features of E4X and explain the design decisions behind JSX.

Historical Context

E4X has been created in 2002 by John Schneider. This was the golden age of XML where it was being used for everything: data, configuration files, code, interfaces (DOM) … E4X was first implemented inside of Rhino, a JavaScript implementation from Mozilla written in Java.

Continue reading …

React + Socket.io

Geert Pasteels made a small experiment with Socket.io. He wrote a very small mixin that synchronizes React state with the server. Just include this mixin to your React component and it is now live!

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changeHandler: function (data) {
if (!_.isEqual(data.state, this.state) && this.path === data.path) {
this.setState(data.state);
}
},
componentDidMount: function (root) {
this.path = utils.nodePath(root);
socket.on('component-change', this.changeHandler);
},
componentWillUpdate: function (props, state) {
socket.emit('component-change', { path: this.path, state: state });
},
componentWillUnmount: function () {
socket.removeListener('component-change', this.change);
}

Check it out on GitHub…

cssobjectify

Andrey Popp implemented a source transform that takes a CSS file and converts it to JSON. This integrates pretty nicely with React.

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/* style.css */
MyComponent {
font-size: 12px;
background-color: red;
}

/* myapp.js */
var React = require('react-tools/build/modules/React');
var Styles = require('./styles.css');

var MyComponent = React.createClass({
render: function() {
return (
<div style={Styles.MyComponent}>
Hello, world!
</div>
)
}
});

Check it out on GitHub…

ngReact

David Chang working at HasOffer wanted to speed up his Angular app and replaced Angular primitives by React at different layers. When using React naively it is 67% faster, but when combining it with angular’s transclusion it is 450% slower.

Rendering this takes 803ms for 10 iterations, hovering around 35 and 55ms for each data reload (that’s 67% faster). You’ll notice that the first load takes a little longer than successive loads, and the second load REALLY struggles - here, it’s 433ms, which is more than half of the total time!

Read the full article…

vim-jsx

Max Wang made a vim syntax highlighting and indentation plugin for vim.

Syntax highlighting and indenting for JSX. JSX is a JavaScript syntax transformer which translates inline XML document fragments into JavaScript objects. It was developed by Facebook alongside React.

This bundle requires pangloss’s vim-javascript syntax highlighting.

Vim support for inline XML in JS is remarkably similar to the same for PHP.

View on GitHub…

Random Tweet

Community Round-up #12

React got featured on the front-page of Hacker News thanks to the Om library. If you try it out for the first time, take a look at the docs and do not hesitate to ask questions on the Google Group, IRC or Stack Overflow. We are trying our best to help you out!

The Future of JavaScript MVC

David Nolen announced Om, a thin wrapper on-top of React in ClojureScript. It stands out by only using immutable data structures. This unlocks the ability to write a very efficient shouldComponentUpdate and get huge performance improvements on some tasks.

We’ve known this for some time over here in the ClojureScript corner of the world - all of our collections are immutable and modeled directly on the original Clojure versions written in Java. Modern JavaScript engines have now been tuned to the point that it’s no longer uncommon to see collection performance within 2.5X of the Java Virtual Machine.

Wait, wait, wait. What does the performance of persistent data structures have to do with the future of JavaScript MVCs?

A whole lot.

Read the full article…

Scroll Position with React

Managing the scroll position when new content is inserted is usually very tricky to get right. Vjeux discovered that componentWillUpdate and componentDidUpdate were triggered exactly at the right time to manage the scroll position.

We can check the scroll position before the component has updated with componentWillUpdate and scroll if necessary at componentDidUpdate

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> componentWillUpdate: function() {
> var node = this.getDOMNode();
> this.shouldScrollBottom =
> (node.scrollTop + node.offsetHeight) === node.scrollHeight;
> },
> componentDidUpdate: function() {
> if (this.shouldScrollBottom) {
> var node = this.getDOMNode();
> node.scrollTop = node.scrollHeight
> }
> },
>

Check out the blog article…

Lights Out

React declarative approach is well suited to write games. Cheng Lou wrote the famous Lights Out game in React. It’s a good example of use of TransitionGroup to implement animations.

Try it out!

Reactive Table Bookmarklet

Stoyan Stefanov wrote a bookmarklet to process tables on the internet. It adds a little “pop” button that expands to a full-screen view with sorting, editing and export to csv and json.

Check out the blog post…

MontageJS Tutorial in React

Ross Allen implemented MontageJS‘s Reddit tutorial in React. This is a good opportunity to compare the philosophies of the two libraries.

View the source on JSFiddle…

Writing Good React Components

William Högman Rudenmalm wrote an article on how to write good React components. This is full of good advice.

The idea of dividing software into smaller parts or components is hardly new - It is the essance of good software. The same principles that apply to software in general apply to building React components. That doesn’t mean that writing good React components is just about applying general rules.

The web offers a unique set of challenges, which React offers interesting solutions to. First and foremost among these solutions is the what is called the Mock DOM. Rather than having user code interface with the DOM in a direct fashion, as is the case with most DOM manipulation libraries.

You build a model of how you want the DOM end up like. React then inserts this model into the DOM. This is very useful for updates because React simply compares the model or mock DOM against the actual DOM, and then only updates based on the difference between the two states.

Read the full article …

Hoodie React TodoMVC

Sven Lito integrated the React TodoMVC example within an Hoodie web app environment. This should let you get started using Hoodie and React.

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Check out on GitHub…

JSX Compiler

Ever wanted to have a quick way to see what a JSX tag would be converted to? Tim Yung made a page for it.

Try it out!

Random Tweet

React v0.8

I’ll start by answering the obvious question:

What happened to 0.6 and 0.7?

It’s become increasingly obvious since our launch in May that people want to use React on the server. With the server-side rendering abilities, that’s a perfect fit. However using the same copy of React on the server and then packaging it up for the client is surprisingly a harder problem. People have been using our react-tools module which includes React, but when browserifying that ends up packaging all of esprima and some other dependencies that aren’t needed on the client. So we wanted to make this whole experience better.

We talked with Jeff Barczewski who was the owner of the react module on npm. He was kind enough to transition ownership to us and release his package under a different name: autoflow. I encourage you to check it out if you’re writing a lot of asynchronous code. In order to not break all of react‘s current users of 0.7.x, we decided to bump our version to 0.8 and skip the issue entirely. We’re also including a warning if you use our react module like you would use the previous package.

In order to make the transition to 0.8 for our current users as painless as possible, we decided to make 0.8 primarily a bug fix release on top of 0.5. No public APIs were changed (even if they were already marked as deprecated). We haven’t added any of the new features we have in master, though we did take the opportunity to pull in some improvements to internals.

We hope that by releasing react on npm, we will enable a new set of uses that have been otherwise difficult. All feedback is welcome!

Changelog

React

  • Added support for more attributes:
    • rows & cols for <textarea>
    • defer & async for <script>
    • loop for <audio> & <video>
    • autoCorrect for form fields (a non-standard attribute only supported by mobile WebKit)
  • Improved error messages
  • Fixed Selection events in IE11
  • Added onContextMenu events

React with Addons

  • Fixed bugs with TransitionGroup when children were undefined
  • Added support for onTransition

react-tools

  • Upgraded jstransform and esprima-fb

JSXTransformer

  • Added support for use in IE8
  • Upgraded browserify, which reduced file size by ~65KB (16KB gzipped)

React v0.5.2, v0.4.2

Today we’re releasing an update to address a potential XSS vulnerability that can arise when using user data as a key. Typically “safe” data is used for a key, for example, an id from your database, or a unique hash. However there are cases where it may be reasonable to use user generated content. A carefully crafted piece of content could result in arbitrary JS execution. While we make a very concerted effort to ensure all text is escaped before inserting it into the DOM, we missed one case. Immediately following the discovery of this vulnerability, we performed an audit to ensure we this was the only such vulnerability.

This only affects v0.5.x and v0.4.x. Versions in the 0.3.x family are unaffected.

Updated versions are available for immediate download via npm, bower, and on our download page.

We take security very seriously at Facebook. For most of our products, users don’t need to know that a security issue has been fixed. But with libraries like React, we need to make sure developers using React have access to fixes to keep their users safe.

While we’ve encouraged responsible disclosure as part of Facebook’s whitehat bounty program since we launched, we don’t have a good process for notifying our users. Hopefully we don’t need to use it, but moving forward we’ll set up a little bit more process to ensure the safety of our users. Ember.js has an excellent policy which we may use as our model.

You can learn more about the vulnerability discussed here: CVE-2013-7035.

Community Round-up #11

This round-up is the proof that React has taken off from its Facebook’s root: it features three in-depth presentations of React done by external people. This is awesome, keep them coming!

Super VanJS 2013 Talk

Steve Luscher working at LeanPub made a 30 min talk at Super VanJS. He does a remarkable job at explaining why React is so fast with very exciting demos using the HTML5 Audio API.

React Tips

Connor McSheffrey and Cheng Lou added a new section to the documentation. It’s a list of small tips that you will probably find useful while working on React. Since each article is very small and focused, we encourage you to contribute!

Intro to the React Framework

Pavan Podila wrote an in-depth introduction to React on TutsPlus. This is definitively worth reading.

Within a component-tree, data should always flow down. A parent-component should set the props of a child-component to pass any data from the parent to the child. This is termed as the Owner-Owned pair. On the other hand user-events (mouse, keyboard, touches) will always bubble up from the child all the way to the root component, unless handled in between.


>
> Read the full article …


## 140-characters textarea

Brian Kim wrote a small textarea component that gradually turns red as you reach the 140-characters limit. Because he only changes the background color, React is smart enough not to mess with the text selection.

See the Pen FECGb by Brian Kim (@brainkim) on CodePen





## Genesis Skeleton

Eric Clemmons is working on a “Modern, opinionated, full-stack starter kit for rapid, streamlined application development”. The version 0.4.0 has just been released and has first-class support for React.
a>

AgFlow Talk

Robert Zaremba working on AgFlow recently talked in Poland about React.

In a nutshell, I presented why we chose React among other available options (ember.js, angular, backbone …) in AgFlow, where I’m leading an application development.

During the talk a wanted to highlight that React is not about implementing a Model, but a way to construct visible components with some state. React is simple. It is super simple, you can learn it in 1h. On the other hand what is model? Which functionality it should provide? React does one thing and does it the best (for me)!

Read the full article…

JSX

Todd Kennedy working at Condé Nast wrote JSXHint and explains in a blog post his perspective on JSX.

Lets start with the elephant in the room: JSX?
Is this some sort of template language? Specifically no. This might have been the first big stumbling block. What looks like to be a templating language is actually an in-line DSL that gets transpiled directly into JavaScript by the JSX transpiler.

Creating elements in memory is quick – copying those elements into the DOM is where the slowness occurs. This is due to a variety of issues, most namely reflow/paint. Changing the items in the DOM causes the browser to re-paint the display, apply styles, etc. We want to keep those operations to an absolute minimum, especially if we’re dealing with something that needs to update the DOM frequently.

Read the full article…

Maykel Loomans, designer at Instagram, wrote a gallery for photos he shot using React.

a>

Random Tweet

Community Round-up #10

This is the 10th round-up already and React has come quite far since it was open sourced. Almost all new web projects at Khan Academy, Facebook, and Instagram are being developed using React. React has been deployed in a variety of contexts: a Chrome extension, a Windows 8 application, mobile websites, and desktop websites supporting Internet Explorer 8! Language-wise, React is not only being used within JavaScript but also CoffeeScript and ClojureScript.

The best part is that no drastic changes have been required to support all those use cases. Most of the efforts were targeted at polishing edge cases, performance improvements, and documentation.

Khan Academy - Officially moving to React

Joel Burget announced at Hack Reactor that new front-end code at Khan Academy should be written in React!

How did we get the rest of the team to adopt React? Using interns as an attack vector! Most full-time devs had already been working on their existing projects for a while and weren’t looking to try something new at the time, but our class of summer interns was just arriving. For whatever reason, a lot of them decided to try React for their projects. Then mentors became exposed through code reviews or otherwise touching the new code. In this way React knowledge diffused to almost the whole team over the summer.

Since the first React checkin on June 5, we’ve somehow managed to accumulate 23500 lines of jsx (React-flavored js) code. Which is terrifying in a way - that’s a lot of code - but also really exciting that it was picked up so quickly.

We held three meetings about how we should proceed with React. At the first two we decided to continue experimenting with React and deferred a final decision on whether to adopt it. At the third we adopted the policy that new code should be written in React.

I’m excited that we were able to start nudging code quality forward. However, we still have a lot of work to do! One of the selling points of this transition is adopting a uniform frontend style. We’re trying to upgrade all the code from (really old) pure jQuery and (regular old) Backbone views / Handlebars to shiny React. At the moment all we’ve done is introduce more fragmentation. We won’t be gratuitously updating working code (if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it), but are seeking out parts of the codebase where we can shoot two birds with one stone by rewriting in React while fixing bugs or adding functionality.

Read the full article

React: Rethinking best practices

Pete Hunt‘s talk at JSConf EU 2013 is now available in video.

Server-side React with PHP

Stoyan Stefanov‘s series of articles on React has two new entries on how to execute React on the server to generate the initial page load.

This post is an initial hack to have React components render server-side in PHP.

  • Problem: Build web UIs
  • Solution: React
  • Problem: UI built in JS is anti-SEO (assuming search engines are still noscript) and bad for perceived performance (blank page till JS arrives)
  • Solution: React page to render the first view
  • Problem: Can’t host node.js apps / I have tons of PHP code
  • Solution: Use PHP then!

Read part 1 …

Read part 2 …

Rendered markup on the server:

TodoMVC Benchmarks

Webkit has a TodoMVC Benchmark that compares different frameworks. They recently included React and here are the results (average of 10 runs in Chrome 30):

  • AngularJS: 4043ms
  • AngularJSPerf: 3227ms
  • BackboneJS: 1874ms
  • EmberJS: 6822ms
  • jQuery: 14628ms
  • React: 2864ms
  • VanillaJS: 5567ms

Try it yourself!

Please don’t take those numbers too seriously, they only reflect one very specific use case and are testing code that wasn’t written with performance in mind.

Even though React scores as one of the fastest frameworks in the benchmark, the React code is simple and idiomatic. The only performance tweak used is the following function:

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/**
* This is a completely optional performance enhancement that you can implement
* on any React component. If you were to delete this method the app would still
* work correctly (and still be very performant!), we just use it as an example
* of how little code it takes to get an order of magnitude performance improvement.
*/
shouldComponentUpdate: function (nextProps, nextState) {
return (
nextProps.todo.id !== this.props.todo.id ||
nextProps.todo !== this.props.todo ||
nextProps.editing !== this.props.editing ||
nextState.editText !== this.state.editText
);
},

By default, React “re-renders” all the components when anything changes. This is usually fast enough that you don’t need to care. However, you can provide a function that can tell whether there will be any change based on the previous and next states and props. If it is faster than re-rendering the component, then you get a performance improvement.

The fact that you can control when components are rendered is a very important characteristic of React as it gives you control over its performance. We are going to talk more about performance in the future, stay tuned.

Guess the filter

Connor McSheffrey implemented a small game using React. The goal is to guess which filter has been used to create the Instagram photo.

React vs FruitMachine

Andrew Betts, director of the Financial Times Labs, posted an article comparing FruitMachine and React.

Eerily similar, no? Maybe Facebook was inspired by Fruit Machine (after all, we got there first), but more likely, it just shows that this is a pretty decent way to solve the problem, and great minds think alike. We’re graduating to a third phase in the evolution of web best practice - from intermingling of markup, style and behaviour, through a phase in which those concerns became ever more separated and encapsulated, and finally to a model where we can do that separation at a component level. Developments like Web Components show the direction the web community is moving, and frameworks like React and Fruit Machine are in fact not a lot more than polyfills for that promised behaviour to come.

Read the full article…

Even though we weren’t inspired by FruitMachine (React has been used in production since before FruitMachine was open sourced), it’s great to see similar technologies emerging and becoming popular.

React Brunch

Matthew McCray implemented react-brunch, a JSX compilation step for Brunch.

Adds React support to brunch by automatically compiling *.jsx files.

You can configure react-brunch to automatically insert a react header (/** @jsx React.DOM */) into all *.jsx files. Disabled by default.

Install the plugin via npm with npm install --save react-brunch.

Read more…

Random Tweet

I’m going to start adding a tweet at the end of each round-up. We’ll start with this one:

React v0.5.1

This release focuses on fixing some small bugs that have been uncovered over the past two weeks. I would like to thank everybody involved, specifically members of the community who fixed half of the issues found. Thanks to Sophie Alpert, Andrey Popp, and Laurence Rowe for their contributions!

Changelog

React

  • Fixed bug with <input type="range"> and selection events.
  • Fixed bug with selection and focus.
  • Made it possible to unmount components from the document root.
  • Fixed bug for disabled attribute handling on non-<input> elements.

React with Addons

  • Fixed bug with transition and animation event detection.
,